1001 Books To Read Before You Die

A quest to read the classic books of the past, in the present, and save the written word along the way.

Indie Bookstores. Libraries. Short Blurbs On the Classics.

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11 Amazing Librarian Tattoos →

(Source: librawrian, via ebookporn)

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quirkbooks:

Keep cool this summer with these bookish ice cream flavors! Sigh. We wish these were real. 

WAIT, NOT REAL????

(via prettybooks)


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lareviewofbooks:

Jim Hinch reviews Cheryl Strayed memoir, Wild, a memoir that documents Strayed 1,100 mile journey along the Pacific Crest Trail, and a marked “triumph” in the genre of nature writing:

An encounter with wildness, transmuted even as it occurs into an opportunity for self-expression. Strayed’s memoir, a New York Times bestseller translated into 28 languages, has been hailed as “a literary and human triumph” (The New York Times Book Review) that single-handedly revives the increasingly moribund genre of American nature writing. In fact, Wild is something altogether different. It’s not a “wilderness story” (again, Times Book Review) at all. It’s an Eat, Pray, Love-style autobiographical quest that only happens to be set in the outdoors. Far from reviving nature writing, Wild’s runaway success marks a further step toward extinction for the genre. 

Read the entire review here.

Side-eye to this book and all the ones like it. There is something so annoying—and vapid—about the way these sorts of “look at me, I found some transcendence!” memoirs are conceived. So you went hiking without any experience. That’s responsible. So you had time to go hiking in some remote area. Glad you’re so privileged and wrote a book about it. I had no idea one could pre-plan a transcendental experience. Come on now. 

I recommend this, in its stead:

Blue Highways: A Journey Into America 

By William Least Heat-Moon

(Source: lareviewofbooks)


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“I am mad for books, just mad for them, and I saw that for some people a book might be just another object, like a shoe, a loaf of bread, a cup. The universe of a book might not be visible to them, for a book’s universe of words does not exist without the participation of eyes.”

The Broken Book by Susan Johnson (via treesofreverie)

(Source: treesofreverie, via wenchingwithshakespeare)

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- July 24 -

wordpainting:

teachingliteracy:

 (by UNAMID Photo)

“When you read a book as a child, it becomes a part of your identity in a way that no other reading in your whole life does.”—from the film, You’ve Got Mail

wordpainting:

teachingliteracy:

 (by UNAMID Photo)

“When you read a book as a child, it becomes a part of your identity in a way that no other reading in your whole life does.”—from the film, You’ve Got Mail

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Currently Reading

- July 22 -

Paradise Lost by John Milton 

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- June 13 -

La Carreta Literaria ¡Leamos! de Cartagena (Cartagena’s Literary Wagon, Let’s read!).

Martín Murillo Gómez has been traveling with his wagon through Cartagena, Colombia. His is the only wagon that transports books.

He lends the books to readers and he also reads to the people who gather around him in parks, plazas, schools and universities.

Sometimes you’ll find him reading from a book with blank pages, stories that he has created for years to invite children to the world of literature.

His journey has led him to meet personalities such as Gabriel García Márquez, who found a copy of One Hundred Years of Solitude and sign it for him.

Thanks to Murillo’s effort and the support of others, the wagon that started with 120 books (some of which he bought with the money he made by selling water on the streets and some which were donated by people who believed in his project) now has 3,500 books.

With the support of sponsors, Murillo has been able to continue with his passion for reading and his commitment to spread the love for literature.

On Facebook.

(via wordpainting)


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